The Challenge

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How might we inspire young people to cultivate their creative confidence? read the brief

Idea

YOUNG people's OpenIDEO—where YOUNG people create confidently, together : LOCAL MEET-UPdates

Let's inspire creative confidence in young people and also learn from them in a YOUNG people's OpenIDEO. OpenIDEO for YOUNG people allows young people to take charge of building their own creative confidence, better, together.*(Toolkit Doodle Notes)
REFINEMENT UPDATE:

Our goal is to get a mix of diverse direct initial feedback about potential modifications for a young people's version from elementary, middle, and high schoolers. To this end, we will be taking our YOUNG User Experience Toolkit and Doodle Notes to our local Palo Alto OpenIDEO meet-up as well as the following public and private schools: 

1. Our local Palo Alto OpenIDEO meet-up: Dec. 3rd
Thanks to four young students (ages 9-13) who came to our recent local Palo Alto meet-up at the Palo Alto Art Center, we were able to get in depth feedback about our concept. See photos, doodle notes, and feedback from our young users in the image gallery above. Jeff Nagata of Creative Confidence through Social Impact also came to our meet-up and, together with the younger participants, we were able to refine our ideas and discuss builds and bridges between a hybrid online and offline, global and local bridging of our two concepts. (Thanks to Palo Alto OpenIDEO meet-up members Ann D. and Sohini Kachhi for their help gathering this Toolkit feedback!)

2. Castilleja Independent School for Girls (Grades 6-12; Palo Alto): Dec. 5th

We recently visited high school students at Castilleja, a private girls school in Palo Alto. We met at the ACE Center—Center for Awareness, Compassion, and Engagement (how great is that!) and gathered valuable insights through YOUNG Doodle Notes and Toolkit Walkthroughs. We have posted select sample highlights above. These students currently have an offline service learning component to their school curriculum. Definite interest in a hybrid online / offline component with OpenIDEO. We are currently assimilating feedback from students and teachers in this regard. Thanks to ACE Director Stacy Kertsman and Castilleja students for sharing their valuable insights. (Thanks also to Palo Alto OpenIDEO meet-up member Sohini Kachhi for helping to gather this Toolkit feedback.)

3. Ohlone Elementary School 4/5 class (Palo Alto): Dec. 6th. 

We met with Ohlone Elementary School Principal Bill and met with a 4/5 grade class. We gathered extensive and amazing feedback from both Bill and the 4/5 students! Bill and teacher Mike are interested in working with us further on this concept and a potential testable pilot. The concept could potentially well support current project-based learning initiatives at Ohlone. A YOUNG OpenIDEO well supports many objectives defined in the  California Core Standards Curriculum (see ELA standard highlights in image gallery above). A YOUNG OpenIDEO could be designed to further complement learning objectives and provide potential OpenIDEO Resident in-school guidance and any necessary materials. In this way a YOUNG OpenIDEO would further support teachers and schools and teachers in turn could help with accountability both online and offline. Bill feels an OpenIDEO in school could work very well in the curriculum with good transparency and communication with parents.

4. Neuva School / Innovation Lab: Mark Schoeffel, Principal of Neuva School in Hillsborough California has also expressed interest in working with us on this idea given their strong emphasis on interdisciplinary, project-based learning and their newly minted Innovation Lab. Next steps: schedule an in-person meeting (pending).

5. East Palo Alto School / Latest update! We have recently connected with East Side College Prep School in East Palo Alto. They are interested in this idea and we are currently coordinating on a meeting date to visit the classroom and gather feedback directly from their young students. We are excited about this new development and look forward to meeting with the young students soon. Thanks also to K-12 Lab Network Director Susie Wise at D.School for ways to further gather diverse feedback and for the link to the helpful Design Thinking in Schools map & resources. 

6. University Students: We also have gathered feedback from NYU students—who have been working on a specially designed course, Design Thinking for Creative Problem Solving, taught by Anne-Laure at NYU. Thanks to Anne Laure and NYU students for the great feedback!

7. Design for Change: We recently skyped with Anshul Aggarwal, Head of Design for Change, based in India. We were interested in how we might best learn from their amazing work and experiences in this area and possible bridges and builds between the offline and online models. We discussed the emphasis on SHARING that happens online in their current model and ways to emphasize and encourage this in the YOUNG OpenIDEO. We are currently connecting with their Boston office to discuss further. 

8. Project H: Similarly, there is much to learn from the local Berkeley-based Project H. They work with K-12 students in making positive, long-lasting change in lives and communities. How might we learn or build upon this initiative with an online or more hybrid online/offline model for young people? 

Please consider sharing a Young User Experience Doodle Note with a young person you know—it takes 5-10 minutes and helps us refine this platform for young people—all young respondents will be kept strictly anonymous. Our thanks.

Other image updates above: 
1. Prototyping ideas—Building on the amazing Hole-in-the-Wall idea, how about an OpenIDEO Hole-in-the-School-Wall? Lunch can be a challenging social time for middle schoolers and high schoolers. This idea helps youth to connect with each other during lunch and other breaks—while designing for good.
2. Potential challenge partners—Oxfam's WE CAN MAKE IT Campaign against poverty.
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CONCEPT SUMMARY

Is it possible that one of the best ways to help nurture creative confidence in young people might be right in front of our eyes? Let's enable youth to learn from and inspire each other through a modified, specially designed version of this platform and in so doing help them to connect to a larger purpose / challenge, more creatively and more confidently, together.
 
Youth themselves are simply closer to the experience of knowing when their creative confidence was boosted (or diminished). And no matter how hard we as former young people try, we are more distant from those first experiences of creative confidence. 

We've also learned from the inspirations that some of the best ways to inspire creative confidence in young people is to learn by DOING and to connect with a purpose LARGER than oneself. OpenIDEO for YOUNG people could do both these things, in spades. (In fact, as those of us well know who have young people in our lives, they will more than likely end up inspiring and nurturing creative confidence in the rest of us in the process.) 
 
Challenges? The challenges could potentially focus on many of the questions that have been brought up during this cc process: how to best re-design schools, spaces, curriculum, cultivate grit and resilience and learn from failure, learn across socio-economic groups, etc. There could also be a mix of the social and environmental challenges that are typically proposed on this platform—all are vital ways to connect with important, relevant, and meaningful real life challenges. This is not busy work. This would take young people's input seriously. Youth could potentially pitch and / or applaud the first creative challenge concept ideas to get things started.

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PROTOTYPING UPDATE
We have put together a BETA YOUNG USER EXPERIENCE TOOLKIT with YOUNG User Experience Doodle Notes (printable link). We invite members of the Virtual Team and other OpenIDEOers to walkthrough the current platform with a young person—10-20 age range—as a way to get initial feedback and insights about what is working or what could be potentially modified in a YOUNG people's version. This is only a guide—we appreciate any and all feedback, with thanks! We'll post and compile the feedback from these toolkits here on an ongoing basis.

Prototyping: We discussed prototyping ideas and next best steps in a recent online chat with Virtual Team members Saskia and Jeff. (Thanks for instigating this discussion Jeff.)

BETA BETA VERSION?: The launch of a BETA BETA version of OpenIDEO for young people beginning with the challenge (for example): How might we enable this platform to inspire and involve more young people in creative confidence? Or something along those lines. This could potentially be a challenge on the current platform to begin with and /or be the a test challenge for a BETA BETA version shared with a limited focus group.

We also also discussed and re-considered the suitability of OpenIDEO in a public school setting. Curious to hear what others think. We would also love to hear feedback on the above ideas from the virtual team and rest of the community. Thanks to all for all the great feedback to date.

Variations on a theme
* OpenIDEO FAIR / SUMMER CAMP * Building upon Yann's idea of an OpenIDEO Fair, we also wondered about an OpenIDEO Summer Camp for young people. Summer Camp meets local meet-up meets OpenIDEO. This way older youth could work as counselors facilitating and coordinating the younger folks in local challenges and / or larger global challenge both offline and online. This could mutually inspire and nurture cc across different age groups and as well serve to further prototype a young people's BETA BETA version of the platform.

MORE VISUAL COLLABORATION? In the comments below, Yann made a great point that we need to consider literacy limitations (and as an extension of this, learning differences) as a potential obstacle for youth, particularly on a global version of this platform. How can we enable young people to share and build upon each others ideas more visually as well as in written form? What online collaborative visual thinking methods exist that we could build upon? Shared whiteboard? Videos?
 
PREVIOUS FEEDBACK / BUILDS
1) Potentially expanded role of OpenIDEO administrators / cross-pollinators:
Saskia noted that a young people's OpenIDEO provides a much needed positive social platform for young people and that expanding the role of OpenIDEO administrators / cross-pollinators in a young people's version would help to nurture and maintain this important positive social space. 
2) Registering and creating profiles through schools: Potentially key in nurturing a positive social space and reducing the more negative aspects of anonymity on social platforms. Need to consider further the suitability of OpenIDEO in a school setting.
3) Young people pitching for challenges? It seems important that we 'post-young people' don't determine challenges from top down but draw and build upon young people's own expertise and ideas right from the start.

Based upon this feedback, we wondered also about adding another step / phase in the young people's version: a CHALLENGE PHASE before INSPIRATION PHASE—where young people pitch and / or vet a curated number of potentially sponsored challenges... What do people think about this extra step and how might this work best?

We wondered about the particular importance of LOCAL MEET-UPS (schools or after-school clubs?) in a young people's version. This would help nurture all phases of the challenge, provide an important social space for young people and may especially help with a vetting process around the challenge itself.

Additional Questions:
Thanks to Jeff for consolidating main questions and builds that are under consideration so far:

- How can we create a positive yet productive "atmosphere" that exists in the current OpenIDEO platform to a OpenIDEO platform for youth? Are there any additional considerations that need to be made for the additional focus of cultivating creative confidence?

- How can we motivate youth to have deep, meaningful engagement with a problem that is larger than themselves? What motivates youth to take action?

- Closely related to the above two questions - how unified vs. diffuse should the challenges be? Allowing youth to submit their own challenges would give them ownership over the platform, creating motivation and more impact on their creative confidence if it gets implemented. At the same time, having sponsored and vetted challenges would increase chances of successful implementation, which would also be good for creative confidence.

- An idea came up where organizations can "adopt" challenges or ideas. We need to figure out what exactly we mean by "adopting", and what the social contract between the adopting organizations and the youth would include. Also, at what stage would the organization "adopt" - during the initial challenges phase, or the final ideas phase?

- Some more suggestions that came up: school registrations for IDs, community administrators & cross pollinators, promise of actual impact and implementation, emphasis on collaboration.

- Should OpenIDEO be structured around teams or individuals?

- What is the best way to incorporate offline meet-ups and local implementation into the global collaborative platform? We discussed the huge power of youth actually experiencing the implementation of their ideas to create tangible, positive change.

- How can we take advantage of a unifying, global challenge and at the same time support local ideas and implementation?

- What existing youth systems/organizations can we leverage and incorporate? Schools came up as a idea for integrating OpenIDEO for youth.

- How can we accommodate challenges and ideas with a diversity of scope? How can we communicate the value of challenges/ideas that are smaller in scope? 

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*This idea was germinated in a recent Palo Alto OpenIDEO meet-up.

*New* Refinement question: What will the future look like with your idea in it?
Aside from building on the imagination, skills, optimism and opinions of young people all over the world for social good, we feel a YOUNG People's OpenIDEO offers one incredibly important and easily overlooked value in particular: the acceleration of INSTITUTIONAL LEGITIMACY for young people. If you already work for an organization you may already be so used to this idea that you don't even realize how critically you build upon the existing organizational infrastructure of your organization to realize and further your creative identity, confidence, as well as your personal and collective goals and dreams. However, if you're an artist, freelancer, or entrepreneur, one of the things that can be most challenging is how to build this kind institutional legitimacy for yourself in a way that similarly enables critical opportunities to collaborate and work with others in the world at large. In other words, to get people to notice your great idea, it can really help to have the authority and vetted cultural weight of an organization behind you. An OpenIDEO for YOUNG people gives young people—who aside from their schools, typically don't have the support of a larger infrastructure—to help carry their amazing ideas into the larger world, more confidently, together because of the accelerated INSTITUTIONAL LEGITIMACY this platform affords. OpenIDEO opens up doors in ideating and refinement for us and other people on this platform in ways that might not otherwise be possible. In this critical way, OpenIDEO for young people has the ability to maximize the creative potential, imagination, optimism and skills of youth through the institutional legitimization and umbrella of OpenIDEO itself. Youth can propose, ideate, refine—all the while reaching out to others within AND beyond OpenIDEO with the organizational weight and authority of the OpenIDEO name itself. We think this a game-changer for young people and for creative confidence. Secondly, consider how a YOUNG People's OpenIDEO could cultivate EMPATHY in youth. From our perspective, OpenIDEO builds upon the premise that empathy and heartfelt attention to human needs is inextricably and vitally linked to deepened creative confidence. Thirdly, we are asking youth to DOUBLE DELIVER in both defining as well as solving the challenges. We believe cultivating this critical re-framing and participation from the beginning is also a personal and collective future game changer.
In this challenge, we want to create ideas with young people, not for them. Outline how you’re planning to involve young people or other end-users (parents, teachers, etc) in designing, iterating or testing your idea during the Ideas phase.
YOUNG USER EXPERIENCE TOOLKIT (with doodle notes) We think it's best to ask young people directly about their experiences with the platform. The toolkit allows helps to gain feedback and insights from young people as they navigate the current platform. The YOUNG User Experience Toolkit with YOUNG User Experience Doodle Notes helps members of the Virtual Team and other OpenIDEOers to get feedback from young people by watching them navigate and interact with the current platform. We'll post and compile feedback from these toolkits here on an ongoing basis. We are aiming to get both visual and written initial feedback. Check out the toolkit here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16xpTAbJm5akRQV0SErNxP-0x9oK4J0ZT6qWDMP54ryg/edit?usp=sharing A BETA BETA version of OpenIDEO for YOUNG people could to follow could ask the question of youth directly: How might we enable this platform to inspire and involve more young people? (or something along those lines). This could potentially be a challenge on the current platform to begin with and /or a BETA BETA version shared with a limited target group.
How might you envision your idea spreading across geographies or cultures so that it inspires young people around the world to cultivate their creative confidence?
By building on the current OpenIDEO award-winning online community of 50K+ innovators from over 90% of the world's countries collaboratively creating new solutions to pressing social impact challenges, in partnership with a wide range of organizations. For example, in a young people's version there could be a potentially good fit with NASA Education: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/informal/youth/#.UofQI5VB8fo The OIEngine.com has the potential to develop creatively confident opportunities for young people, at scale.
What skills, input or guidance would you like to receive from the OpenIDEO community to help you build out or refine your idea further?
(Please also see updated questions above). What is the age distribution of the current platform? How could we re-think another variation on the platform to specifically engage and attract more young people? What kinds of creative challenges are possible? What elements of the current OpenIDEO might work best, and what elements are not as suitable? And finally, what do your kids and/or other young people you know think?

Team

Comments

Join the conversation and post a comment.

Lucas Ross

December 20, 2013, 22:48PM
Congratulations Mel + Frank. I am so happy your idea was a winner. I look forward to seeing where you take the concept from here.

Mandy Pichler

December 18, 2013, 16:59PM
Congratulations, Mel + Frank! I am so excited for you. If there is anything I can assist you with moving forward just let me know!

Congratulations, again!

Hao Dinh

December 17, 2013, 22:50PM
Mel + Frank, congrats on being selected as one of the winning ideas. I really like the Doodle Notes!
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Yann Hirlimann

December 17, 2013, 21:25PM
Congratulations!!! let's kick it off!! this time we'll have time here to try it out and have kids using it as creative confidence builder!!!!
keep us posted? How does it work when the challenge is over? Will you continue on the idea?
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Mel + Frank

December 18, 2013, 07:00AM
Thanks Yann, really appreciate all your help and enthusiasm throughout process! We're trying to figure out what happens next— we'll keep you posted. Looking forward to working together some more on this again soon!

Mike Hatrick

December 16, 2013, 08:50AM
When I first read this idea and watched the video my immediate thoughts were "what sort of challenges would young people choose", and my immediate next thought was that it might be something to do with improving Minecraft...

http://....so I was kind of amazed when I read "how might we's" about world peace, avoiding discrimination, etc. Quite inspiring really!

Then I saw some Minecraft-related materials from your workshops, and how they were using it in a positive way perhaps to help grab young folk's attention to challenges. Nice.

My lasting impression is that what might be created here is a modern version of pen-pall'ing, except not just to tell your pen-pall what you've been up to and get to know them, but to use them in a creative way and of course in a "crowd" format, not just 1:1.

Nice job!
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Mel + Frank

December 16, 2013, 22:43PM
Thanks Mike! It's fascinating how many young people suggested minecraft and other familiar "portals" as part of the OI design approach itself... and interesting to hear how this tracked with your own train of thought as well. And yes, agree there is the rich potential to strengthen social bonds through a kind of pen-palling / collaborative exchange for social good. The young OI platform could really inspire youth wrapped up in the online world of social media to encourage each other to use this social energy confidently and creatively together. In this way, the OI platform for youth could be a kind of bridge between the online and offline worlds...
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Yann Hirlimann

December 12, 2013, 22:32PM
Hi Mel and Frank. Gret to see that things are moving forward on your side. Sorry for the lack of feedback on my side. The people I had given the doodles to were over busy. I hope your platform will move forward ad that we can test it here with kids. I'll ollow it closely. If you need any refinement ideas from here, do not hesitate.
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Mel + Frank

December 14, 2013, 15:34PM
No worries Yann, thanks for checking in. Appreciate all your feedback so far—be great to work on this further together and test it with youth in your area. Hope the Imagination Lab opening went well!

Mandy Pichler

December 10, 2013, 16:25PM
Hi Mel + Frank,

Congrats on the fantastic submission!

I just wanted to let you know that I created a document, which could be called Volume I, regarding grants. I've been having a difficult time posting it/uploading the google doc but I do have a link on my profile page for: "Grant Writing - Advice from the Trenches".

You should be able to access the link on my profile though I believe it brings you to my google drive. . .but it's there for you to peruse! Hopefully, it will help you secure some funding for your awesome program!

Best,
Mandy
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Mel + Frank

December 10, 2013, 17:00PM
Thanks Mandy. Interested in checking out but can't seem to find it at first glance... ?

Mandy Pichler

December 10, 2013, 17:17PM
It's posted on my profile page; I'm getting very mixed reviews re: the ability to open it. Some people can, others can't. If you fall into the later category, I can email it to you. I just don't have time to fiddle with the link right now as I need to get to an appointment and my afternoon is pretty booked up. But I'll be checking with OpenIDEO as soon as I can.

Best,
Mandy

Mandy Pichler

December 10, 2013, 20:52PM
New link to the "Grant Writing - Advice from the Trenches" document! This one should work, fingers crossed:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_wsTrSxUjAYdEYwOGZwbDAwZ2s/edit
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Mel + Frank

December 11, 2013, 20:54PM
Thanks Mandy! Wonderful resource and much appreciated.

Ahmet Acar

December 10, 2013, 11:02AM
really cool to see that you've prototyped & tested this in various schools :)
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Mel + Frank

December 10, 2013, 15:20PM
Thanks Ahmet. We're taking the current OpenIDEO platform to a number of schools and, using our toolkit, we are asking for feedback about what works well for them and what could work better. It's been great to see how youth are really engaged with this meta-level, big picture thinking.

Lucas Ross

December 09, 2013, 14:55PM
I am really excited about this idea. I find confidence builds in my kids from the knowledge of the possible. The more ideas made possible you see the more it opens doors for them. Seeing things happen demystifies them and opens the possibility of the child doing anything they wish to commit to. OpenIDEO shows ideas becoming reality. Not only that you can see how they came to be thought the project content though stages and comments from participants. My oldest is 13, so I will get her feedback and her friends as well to share with you.
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Mel + Frank

December 09, 2013, 19:20PM
Thanks Lucas. This is helpful feedback as we've been especially curious to hear from other parents about this (see Meena's comments below). We also think that visualizing the process of tackling a challenge from inspiration to solution / realization is valuable for young people to see and be guided through as well and why the online model seems important. It would be great to hear feedback from your 13-year old (we haven't hit that age yet!). We have created a basic toolkit / walkthrough guide as a way to help gather feedback. You can find the link here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16xpTAbJm5akRQV0SErNxP-0x9oK4J0ZT6qWDMP54ryg/edit

Thanks again!

Lucas Ross

December 10, 2013, 22:07PM
My 13 year old daughter spent some time today on Open Ideo. I had a conversation with her about the experience. I have answered the below based on that conversation as I did not have the questions to hand. My comments are listed below each question.

Is this platform easy for you to navigate? Are you confused by anything?
A lot going on all at the same time. Liked the bar at the top of the page to easily see where in the process the challenge is.

Is this platform something that you would want to use? Why or why not?
Yes, but would like to be able to more easily share to other social networks for feedback and to get friends involved.

What else would you want from OpenIDEO that could help improve the experience? Make it more familiar to the user. Facebook/twitter/instagram, etc… My daughter understands the function and interface, so it would be more comfortable to have similar interactions. She found that the design was getting in the way of the interaction.

Are you interested in the challenges? Would you be interested in global challenges or more local challenges? The first global issue that she was aware and involved in was the campaign against ‘Kony’. She and her friends were not only active in the online world around the issue, but also move offline. As we discussed the Open Ideo platform, she said it would be a great way to spend time vs pure socialising on Facebook.

Do you like the idea of a young people’s version? If so, how would you design the platform differently? Similar to the comments above, make it familiar as possible to take away any friction for the young users that are not as accustom to trudging through a new interface as adults are due to jobs/banks/cars all creating new interfaces that we are forced to learn to interact.

How closely do you need to guide young person? Do they need a lot of encouragement? To what extent are they exploring on their own?
As a computer/internet native, she was not bothered about clicking on anything that was interesting.
What do they spend the most time on? The least time on?
The long update notes and comments were the least looked at. Pictures, graphics and videos got the most attention. Thought – maybe vlog updates vs text entries.
Do they read in detail or jump around?
Lots of jumping around, but it was a getting to know the system and seeing what it was about and what sort of content was inside.

What visual content (videos, images) are they drawn to (if any)?
She watched the ‘getting started’ video about why Open Ideo was started and what the aim of the platform is. Also, when we got to this challenge she watched the video of the Kelly brothers introducing the concept.

Are they having trouble navigating or understanding something on the site?
She did not like the comment section. The best I can unpick this is that it was too abrupt and not like having a chat. It was hard to see who and why these people were commenting. I think she wanted topic chains where pieces could be discussed vs on comment chain. Sorry, not really describing this well, but hope you get the gist.

Let me know if you would like any of these points drawn out further.
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Mel + Frank

December 11, 2013, 20:56PM
Hey Lucas—sorry for the delay in getting back to you. Thank you for gathering this valuable feedback and big thanks also to your daughter! MUCH appreciated. Your daughters comments resonate with other feedback we have received so far... We have heard from other young users that they would prefer an interface more related to commonly used social media sites. Many youth we have spoken with have also flagged the comment section as the least optimal aspect of the platform for them. Great idea about the vlog and also good to hear that a younger version appeals as a way to connect with others for social good beyond pure socializing of facebook... We will add the above insights and take-aways to the mix as a way to determine next best steps on this idea. Many thanks again!

Hao Dinh

December 05, 2013, 04:22AM
Mel + Frank, check it out, your concept is highlighted in this week's Field Note.

http://www.openideo.com/fieldnotes/openideo-team-notes/creative-confidence-challenge-community-champion-update-11/
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Mel + Frank

December 05, 2013, 18:25PM
Thanks Hao!

Meena Kadri

December 04, 2013, 21:54PM
Awesome updates and it's exciting to see the range of outreach you're doing with potential end users!
 
For one's you've yet to do, it could be exciting to explore further what resonates most with these groups of young people around our broad mission of collaborating for social good (or this concept's focus on collaborating to build creative confidence) – is it engaging online, offline or a combination of both? Seems there could be many possibilities for directions that OpenIDEO for Kids could go and that digging in more about preferences for online / offline / hybrid could be interesting? And I wonder what parents think about this topic too? I chatted to a few parents in my neighbourhood who were most drawn the exciting offline avenues proposed on this idea. Made me wonder about the leanings of parents (& kids) elsewhere…

Looking forward to more of your inspiring and agile Refinement acrobatics! You've taken us on such an exciting journey to date :^)
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Mel + Frank

December 05, 2013, 21:33PM
Thanks Meena. We had a chance to take these questions to Castilleja Girls School (high school students) this afternoon. This school is already unusually well grounded in design thinking for social impact and so it was really interesting to get their initial feedback. Many of them felt that they would really like to see this work online AND offline —as a way to meet with other schools engaged in the process. Working offline and interacting with other schools around challenges seemed to be a pretty exciting idea to them... Others thought it could potentially work to complement their current social impact projects in school. They already have a school program in place where they determine challenges and pitch ideas to solve them! Will post more feedback to follow.
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Ashley Jablow

December 05, 2013, 22:39PM
Love that you went to Casti, Mel + Frank! That's where I went to school :)
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Mel + Frank

December 09, 2013, 18:31PM
Cool! Clearly there is a great foundation here grounding students in social impact :) The new Center for Awareness, Compassion and Engagement (ACE Center) is amazing—so impressed with this important initiative and learning space for the students.
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Anne-Laure Fayard

December 01, 2013, 17:39PM
Hi Mel+Frank, I was looking at this website today and I thought it could be a great source of inspiration: http://dfcworld.com/dfcchallenge.html

In particular in terms of seeing what kind of projects can inspire kids.

cheers

al
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Mel + Frank

December 05, 2013, 18:26PM
Thanks A-L—we're skyping with Anshul, who leads Design for Change tomorrow! We'll keep you posted!
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Anne-Laure Fayard

December 10, 2013, 03:20AM
Great! I've seen the summary of your conversation. It seems that it was quite positive. I also like the idea of the openIDEO-hole-in-the-school-wall to prototype the concept. I think it will be a great way to create awareness and interest. It will be great if you could have a paper board / or a painted wall with some markers nearby so that kids might start discussing options.
I'm wondering if you have thought at this point to revisit a previous challenge. e.g. the one by James Oliver on fresh food or the ones of schools in developing countries.
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Mel + Frank

December 10, 2013, 15:16PM
Thanks Anne-Laure. We wrote a comment earlier but looks like it didn't go through. Glad the hole-in-the-school-wall idea resonates and the additional builds you suggest are great. Would be interesting to flesh this out further and prototype "outdoor spaces to create together" for the often socially complex "inbetween" times at school (lunch, breaks). Likely good next step to re-visit previous challenges such as the one you mentioned—we've asked a number of young people what challenges they would be interested in and many engaged in this kind of big picture challenge thinking—and also offered some off the wall funny (and very creative) challenge ideas!

Hao Dinh

November 29, 2013, 07:05AM
Mel + Frank, I plan to provide another Field Note update on all the Refinement ideas by Sunday (Dec 1). Let me know by Saturday 6 pm EST USA if there is anything you want me to highlight to help progress your concept. Any prototypes completed, any assistance needed, any breakthroughs or anything you want to highlight. You can provide me video or text. I will consolidate. Thanks in advance.
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Mel + Frank

November 30, 2013, 20:49PM
Hao—here is a summary of our progress to date. Thanks for putting this together!

YOUNG People's OpenIDEO by Mel + Frank
We are currently gathering initial feedback from young people themselves about what works well and could work better for them on the current platform. We have received back our first batch of User Experience Doodle Notes (http://www.openideo.com/open/creative-confidence/ideas/openideo-2014-where-young-people-create-confidently-together/gallery/oi-user-exp-doodles-nyu.pdf/ [HAO: if video please include first Doodle Note feedback in our image gallery, if possible; Pls delete this bracket if using in text form].

Mel is a coordinator for the local Palo Alto OpenIDEO meet-up and so we are extending an invitation to young people to join our next meet-up in a couple of days to help us gather direct feedback from young people themselves (as well as to help refine other shortlisted concepts brought forward by the group). Finally, we are meeting with students, teachers, and principals at local schools to help us further refine our concept and get direct feedback from young folks. How can you help? Please consider sharing the current OpenIDEO platform with a young person you know—age 10-20—with the help of these User Experience Doodle Notes (http://www.openideo.com/open/creative-confidence/ideas/openideo-2014-where-young-people-create-confidently-together/gallery/doodle_sheet_feedback.pdf/). It takes 5 mins and really helps us all bring this creatively formative OpenIDEO experience for social good also to young people. Thanks!

Hao Dinh

November 30, 2013, 20:51PM
Awesome! Thxs

Hao Dinh

November 25, 2013, 19:27PM
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Ashley Jablow

November 25, 2013, 17:17PM
LOVING your video Mel + Frank! Keep those Refinement updates coming - it's great to see what you're up to :)
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Mel + Frank

November 28, 2013, 04:15AM
Thanks Ashley—was kinda fun actually! Just added some awesome Young User Doodle Notes from Anne-Laure's NYU students and more to come!

Nathan Maton

November 24, 2013, 13:34PM
I started to think about who I could recruit to test this and realized quickly that I didn't know your definition of a young person? Where's the critical cutoff as you see it where other reflections would be outside of the target audience as you see it?
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Mel + Frank

November 24, 2013, 16:36PM
Hey Nate—We think 13-18 is a good target range. We'll update the concept above to make that clear. Thanks for thinking of someone that might be a good fit for this age bracket!

Meena Kadri

November 25, 2013, 06:28AM
Also noting here that IDEO's Kelly brothers have determined that around 10 years old is a critical point for either forming or losing creative confidence. You might want to think about whether this idea could be tailored to includes kids right at this significant age.

And we're loving the toolkit to include young people in your ideation process. Hope you'll upload some of the examples from this to your post in good time. Can't wait to see what they have to add!
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Mel + Frank

November 25, 2013, 06:56AM
Interesting note about critical point around 10 years old... We had thought it best to keep the site around the same age group as Facebook, but based on this info thinking we should open it up, for now—thanks for the feedback. As part of our ideating with young people we are also reaching out to our local meet-up members to help. Working to gather some young people to attend our meet-up and ideate with us as well, which would be ideal!

Nathan Maton

November 22, 2013, 12:34PM
Hey Mel,

I love the toolkit you've provided. Have you seen the 5th graders' comments on the site? That's a good starting point for your prototyping: http://www.openideo.com/profiles/lrei-middle-school/. It'd be awesome to see if you can get a few more like that in this phase.
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Mel + Frank

November 22, 2013, 17:01PM
Thanks Nate. We've just reached out. It would be great to get their collective feedback and insights using this platform!

Kirk Soderstrom

November 22, 2013, 04:10AM
You totally have to check out DIY.org! I saw it in Fast Company earlier today, and there may be some elements to learn from as the idea evolves. There seems to be a need for a safe platform like this; earlier in this challenge, the 5th grade class from LREI participated. I'm curious to see how this idea develops!
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Mel + Frank

November 22, 2013, 17:05PM
Hi Kirk—thanks, great suggestion on the DIY and on LREI 5th Graders. We've reached out to them and hope we can connect and learn more from their collective experiences on this platform. Also, big congrats also to you on your concept to develop a Creative Confidence Parents and Teachers Edition—smart idea!

Hao Dinh

November 22, 2013, 00:15AM
Mel + Frank, this is Hao Dinh, the Challenge Community Champion. Congrats on being shortlisted. So many good ideas thus I want to make it easy for folks to quickly educate themselves on the ideas so they can focus on helping refine the concepts.

Can you provide me an elevator speech of your idea, maximum 10 seconds audio/video. Or you can reply to my post with text. I plan to consolidate the elevator speeches into one Field Note. (Field Notes are weekly challenge updates)

My thought is to provide you an opportunity to hype up your concept, ask for whatever assistance you need or provide suggestions on how to prototype your idea.

Much appreciated if I can get your elevator speech by Friday (November 22) 11 pm EST USA.

Thank you in advance,
Hao

Hao Dinh

November 22, 2013, 05:02AM
Mel + Frank, sorry I meant 30 seconds not 10 seconds.

Also hints on developing a elevator speech: http://theundercoverrecruiter.com/how-create-your-memorable-elevator-pitch-four-simple-steps/
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Mel + Frank

November 22, 2013, 16:17PM
We will do our best to get something to you by tonight. Thanks Hao!
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Mel + Frank

November 23, 2013, 04:30AM
Hello Hao! We are getting there—working on both ideas and we'll get both to you asap!
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Mel + Frank

November 23, 2013, 07:01AM
Hey Hao—here is the link to our video (pwd: CC). It's uploading and should be ready to go soon: https://vimeo.com/80127988.

Nathan Maton

November 24, 2013, 13:52PM
Hey Mel, why don't you pull that video link up into the body of your idea so more people will find it? You could even put it in the idea gallery. Just some food for thought, perhaps there's also a good reason not to but I know not everyone makes it into the comments of an idea.
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Mel + Frank

November 24, 2013, 16:45PM
Thanks Nate, we wondered about that but since it was a promo piece for Hao wasn't sure it was appropriate for the gallery above. Think it's a good idea though. We'll throw it up there!

Hao Dinh

November 24, 2013, 17:33PM
Mel + Frank, no worries on posting on the gallery. Thanks for the awesome video!
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Yann Hirlimann

November 21, 2013, 23:29PM
Exciting to see you're in the last 22s! Sorry for not collaborating lately but we are setting up our first design thinking lab for kids in Senega, so lots of work going on.
I'm going to add a suggestion, for less developed countries (I like being their embassador). I would consider working with a project I've already talked about, called the " school in the cloud"/ hole in the wall ((TED winner this year). The learning booths they are setting would correspond completely with the IDEO for kids concept.
Concerning the question about sponsored/ non sponsored challenges, I would opt for community sponsored challenges. A community would set a challenge, local kids would be the leads and kids from around the planet would collaborate. a "think global, act local" kind of approach.
looking forwar to the responses given by kids. Hope you aim at both already confident and shy kids.
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Mel + Frank

November 22, 2013, 17:14PM
Yann, love it. Definitely a lot to learn from Hole in the Wall. Do you have any involvement in this project—would be great to get your insights on aspects that resonate with you in particular if so. Also, totally in agreement with a platform that builds and supports cc across a range of personality types and levels of confidence. Our current thinking is that the online platform could draw out more reflective thinkers who prefer to consider their comments and ideas carefully through written or visual form, instead of speaking off the cuff orally in a group setting (a way of ideating that might be more comfortable for extroverted personality types). We learned some of these ideas about incorporating a range of personality types from this inspirational book by Susan Cain called QUIET—you might find it interesting also: http://www.openideo.com/open/creative-confidence/inspiration/learning-the-power-of-quiet/
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Yann Hirlimann

November 22, 2013, 17:53PM
Love the book! I've added it to my kindle!
Unfortunately I'm not involved in the hole in the wall, but I love the approach and so much believe in it. A good Idea would be to directly organise a chat with its founder. I guess he is busy but I also guess that he is very keen to help in the development of ideas like yours, at I really believe it is a tool he could use. Just give it a try, it would be very very insightful for refining the project!
We are probably going to set a design lab in Senegal in a low income areanext year. I would love to test your tool, if only it was in french :(
Maybe you could test with an english pseaking african country. I found this project in Kenya using design thinking. I do not know them, but their approach looks great. It would be good to test the idea with them. http://designigniteschange.org/projects/851-designing-for-the-agape-mercy-children
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Mel + Frank

November 22, 2013, 21:33PM
Thanks Yann, this looks like another great resource.
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Mel + Frank

November 25, 2013, 07:15AM
Hi Yann, we would really appreciate it if you could reach out to the young folks you know between the ages of 10-18 and get their feedback on the OpenIDEO platform! We think it's especially important to get feedback from young people directly about what works well for them on the platform and what could work better. Especially interested in more visual elements as we've discussed. We can more easily gather feedback from young people in our area but we also would really like to get feedback from youth in other parts of the world... We have put together a toolkit here with a few suggested question pointers and walkthrough ideas—you can check it out here:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/16xpTAbJm5akRQV0SErNxP-0x9oK4J0ZT6qWDMP54ryg/edit

It can take 15 minutes or less and it would be oh so helpful! If you could consider getting feedback from young people in your area sometime in the next week. This would help us gather and compile our findings. Thanks for considering!
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Yann Hirlimann

November 25, 2013, 12:00PM
Hi there. I'm forwarding that to my colleague. Her kids are in that age group, and I'll see if she can reacch kids studying at the british council.
It could take us a few days to organize. Sorry, but we are opening our first imagination Lab in 2 weeks time here in Dakar, so lot's of work going on.
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Mel + Frank

November 25, 2013, 15:06PM
Thanks Yann—totally understand. It's a bit of a sprint to refine in a couple of weeks and so getting some initial feedback from youth directly seems like the best way for us to focus our efforts for now. Whenever and whatever feedback you can offer is much appreciated. That is exciting news about the first the opening of the Imagination Lab in Dakar. Have a feeling you may have sent me a link about this but can't find it now. Love it if you could send me a link or more info (again?) when you have a chance. Be interested in checking this out further... thanks again.
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Mel + Frank

November 27, 2013, 23:56PM
The nomadic museum idea is also quite related to the roaming residency experience and the global residency exchanges that take place all over the world...
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Mel + Frank

November 27, 2013, 23:58PM
Yes, thanks and after following the link above think this might also be related to this: http://imaginationafrikaworld.wordpress.com
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Yann Hirlimann

November 28, 2013, 00:57AM
yep. Both are linked. This is the great organization I am working with. THe imagination lab was not described in the concept but we are testing it the coming month! should be good fun!
The lab is a classic design thinking lab where kids will spend one hour solving simple upcycling, or repurposing of traditional objects challenges. I'll keep you updated.
Concerning the Ideo quesitonnaire, I will recall my partners tommorrow, hoping they will have tried it.
 
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Mel + Frank

November 28, 2013, 04:23AM
Thanks Yann. We have just updated the concept with some doodle note feedback from NYU students—check them out if you get a chance! Might work well to forward the idea of doodle notes specifically to your partners—easy, quick way to get feedback and very helpful! You can find the doodle notes as pdf below. Really appreciate any feedback. All best with the launch of the Imagination Lab coming up...
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Mel + Frank

November 28, 2013, 04:24AM
Selected NYU doodle note feedback is in the image gallery above FYI
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Yann Hirlimann

November 28, 2013, 09:28AM
thanks. Very insightful. Especially the slowness of access (very relevant here) and the importance of having community managers supporting every participant. I wonder wheter twitter would be a good tool, as the messages need to be very short...
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Mel + Frank

November 28, 2013, 17:57PM
Yes, Twitter is definitely coming through loud and clear so far as an important component of a potentially modified young people's version...

Meena Kadri

November 28, 2013, 19:58PM
I wonder if use of Twitter might vary by age, location and other factors? I was interested to see results of a survey elsewhere on our challenge of 5th graders: https://www.dropbox.com/s/3fmzx6yflvgblac/Survey%205th%20Graders.pdf (see the last page: Are You Tech Savvy) Obviously it's only a small sample, one age group and in one location – though opened my thinking about the various channels through which young folks might be engaged. Thought it might also inspire some multi-pronged thinking on this concept :^)

OpenIDEO

November 21, 2013, 21:31PM
Mel + Frank, congrats on making the Top 22 shortlist! We've always believed OpenIDEO has the potential to impact how young people understand the world and their ability to design and problem-solve for social impact. We also loved your early prototyping in google docs and the updates you shared throughout the Ideas phase. During Refinement, we have a couple of pointers for you: first, keep up the great work with the interview/insights you're collecting. Second, we're especially eager to hear your thoughts on the business model behind this. Right now OpenIDEO challenges are sponsored – would you envision this Young People's OpenIDEO also being sponsored? Or would it be a nonprofit undertaking and how might that be supported? Finally, you've probably seen that similar ideas have been posted by others in this challenge – perhaps you'd like to reach out to those folks and invite them to share their insights and feedback on your idea, to help you grow and build it even further? For more tips for this Refinement phase, check out http://ideo.pn/cc-refinetips and catch our Lowdown on Refinement at http://bit.ly/oi_refine
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Mel + Frank

November 22, 2013, 15:50PM
Thanks OpenIDEO! This is great feedback. We look forward to exploring these questions and testing this idea with young people directly in this refinement phase.
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Mel + Frank

November 22, 2013, 17:10PM
Thanks Rachael—and yes! We just posted to your site and hope we can gather our insights together on this with an eye to refining and prototyping this concept further for young people...

Paul Ecclestone-Brown

November 20, 2013, 09:07AM
Hi this like the other incarnations of this idea is great

How will safeguaring issues be handled on the site - my view is that either schools can create their own walled garden in the site and let teachers make links through a social web or that a lot of the site is made anonymous by the use of set avatars and initials and broad locations. Clearly the teachers must have view on what all their kids are posting

What other moderation is needed? -Use of a UK system like the CEOP button?

How about using the platform in school design clubs?

http://www.openideo.com/open/creative-confidence/ideas/the-design-club/

Meena Kadri

November 19, 2013, 23:21PM
So many exciting ideas! I'm a bit behind on all the conversations – but I wonder whether global OpenIDEO Meetup groups could be leveraged to hold in-person OpenIDEO sessions with kids? Perhaps they could host sessions on a particular local issue which is relevant to children and which they could be inspired to take action on – while gaining feedback, support and a nurturing process via the OpenIDEO Meetup groups? If anything, it could be a way of testing some of the assumptions on this idea before committing to a junior dedicated online platform – and may even morph the idea into other awesome directions? (sorry if someone has suggested this already. pressed for time to keep up with all the awesome conversations here :^)
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Mel + Frank

November 20, 2013, 04:44AM
Hi Meena—we hadn't discussed this yet and totally agree. Wondering actually about inviting some young people to the prototyping meetup...

Meena Kadri

November 20, 2013, 04:55AM
That's a super idea, Mel. Will be great to hear about their interactions and what seems to resonate most with them. Looking forward to hearing how things go.

Alice Kim

November 17, 2013, 15:29PM
Hello, Mel!

I was also thinking about children's openIDEO.
OpenIDEO is a perfect platform to come up with good solution for our problems of society. Why not? This platform can be applied to the young people.
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Mel + Frank

November 17, 2013, 19:38PM
Thanks Alice!

élodie soler

November 17, 2013, 15:22PM
Hi Mel - Such a great idea !!
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Mel + Frank

November 17, 2013, 19:40PM
Thanks! How to make it work optimally for young people... re-considering platform entirely or are their some basic modifications? Working on a feedback form for youth help us get some initial feedback on ways youth interact with current platform to help us think through this a bit more...

élodie soler

November 17, 2013, 19:50PM
Well, I think the platform is pretty well thought but I noticed a few problems. First, you cannot go back to a conversation that you've participated! You have to search for the inspiration/concept (if you remember exactly the name). Secondly, the entry of the challenge is not always obvious depending if you are on your page "contribution" or on a "concept", etc. But for the rest, I would say that the interactions are pretty well done. (:
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Jeff Nagata

November 17, 2013, 04:32AM
Hey everyone! Here's the link to the Google doc where you can add initial prototyping questions for youth: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16xpTAbJm5akRQV0SErNxP-0x9oK4J0ZT6qWDMP54ryg/edit?usp=sharing

Like Mel + Frank said, we're hoping to iterate over multiple prototyping sessions to learn what needs to be modified in the current OpenIDEO platform to make it suitable for youth.

The questions will be used to create a "Young People's Interview Toolkit" that people can use to interview and observe youth as they use OpenIDEO for the creative confidence challenge. The goal is to get initial insights into what needs to be changed in the current platform.

We're hoping to narrow down to a few focused questions by Tuesday!

P.S. Also might be helpful to check out the current OpenIDEO interview toolkit for ideas: http://www.openideo.com/open/mayo-clinic/gallery/interview_kit_ageing_mayo.pdf/
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Mel + Frank

November 17, 2013, 12:49PM
hey jeff—seems like on this google doc we are developing two sets of questions:

1) what are the questions we hope to answer in the process i.e. what do we ultimately hope to discover through this toolkit process?

2) what are some specific question pointers that we can ask young people while they are navigating the site? And any other content that would be valuable for this feedback toolkit (doodle notes for kids? etc.)

Is this how you understood it?
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Anne-Laure Fayard

November 17, 2013, 14:46PM
I agree it'd be great if you could clarify a bit the objectives of the interview kit - what we are interested in learning - and some questions you might want to use when we get kids navigating the site. By the way, it'd be great to also show them the various challenges and see if they have some they are more interested in than others. Doodle notes is a good idea.
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Jeff Nagata

November 17, 2013, 18:27PM
Sorry it's a little confusing! Mel, from our conversation I assumed that the questions we would develop would be closer to the first set. That way, those questions could act as a "starter-guide" on the Toolkit, but leave it flexible enough for people to formulate their own questions as they go along.

That was just my assumption though. What does everyone think? Do you think we should have both sets of questions?

Also Anne-Laure, I really like the idea of showing the youth various challenges that have been on OpenIDEO - it would be interesting to see if any challenges engage the youth more than the others.
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Mel + Frank

November 17, 2013, 19:32PM
Anne-Laure - great idea to show youth all various challenges as part of this initial feedback process. Not sure what you meant when you said, "I agree that if you are not running specific challenges (I thought that was the original idea but I realize this has evolved), then it will be hard to have teachers involving students in their classes." Still thinking specific challenges are on the table... (it's tricky for all when there are so many comments to distill all the feedback and conversations and so wanted to be sure I understood correctly!)

Jeff my impression was we want to create a feedback form / guide similar to the interview starter kit so that people can use as guide when talking to young folks and have some way to record their findings... Perhaps it doesn't need to be so set in stone. Just some question pointers, doodle notes, then have at it!
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Mel + Frank

November 17, 2013, 19:34PM
my take on it anyway—love to hear what you all think!
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Anne-Laure Fayard

November 17, 2013, 19:46PM
Hi,

re. the interview kit, I personally it will be useful to provide people with some guidelines, ideas about how to get feedback about the platform from young people. I will personally not talk about creative confidence, or creativity (two big words) but focus on how they understand the process, what they think about the challenges, how they react to the ideas and the comments... more of a user experience approach... My guess is that we will still get a lot about how it can support their creative confidence...

Mel+Frank, thanks for pushing me to clarify. You wrote: "As for schools, agree it could be a great after school complement, camp, etc. and feel that there is a lot of potential to make an impact in schools in general, though perhaps not directly for curriculum given that it is a business-related platform... ?"
I agree that if the idea is to use the platform and the current challenges, it might be difficult to use it in the context of the curriculum. Yet, if the challenges are designed specifically for the openIDEO for young people you could imagine some being more easy to integrate in the curriculum. E.g. a challenge around sustainability could be used in science (understanding some of the issues), ELA (writing about the issues, developing campaigns, writing books or poems), Technology + science (thinking of developing solutions) and even social studies (understanding the evolution of the issues and the debates at the society level). It requires some work but it could be done in parallel to a unit and one teacher could take the lead. In schools where there is a lot of project work, it could be more easily integrated.
Do you see what I mean?
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Jeff Nagata

November 18, 2013, 09:19AM
Hi Mel, I think we're definitely on the same page here with the Toolkit. Is there anything else you think we should add to the Google doc to make the wording more clear, or do you think it's okay the way it is now?

Also, Anne-Laure, after reading all your comments about the value of observing the youth go through the actual PROCESS of OpenIDEO, I'm wondering if we should start brainstorming the best ways in which youth can be guided through the process of the OpenIDEO platform.

How can we gain insight from youth engaging in the current OpenIDEO process?

Should we include this in our first round of prototyping, or is this something to do for the future prototyping sessions?

In my understanding, a big obstacle is that once a phase passes on OpenIDEO, we can't experience the processes in a organic way anymore.
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Jeff Nagata

November 18, 2013, 09:40AM
Sorry just wanted to clarify about the Google doc - by adding to the Google doc, I meant adding instructions to make it more clear that we're just trying to create guiding questions that would create a flexible Toolkit?

Also, another thought is that maybe we can just make the Toolkit as flexible as possible (which I think was your intention from the beginning, Mel), with a few suggestions, and then let OpenIDEOers figure out the best way to test out the current OpenIDEO.

Maybe other OpenIDEOers would be able to find creative ways to find out how youth engage with the process of the platform, as well as gain insight into their thoughts and feelings on the platform.
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Anne-Laure Fayard

November 18, 2013, 13:45PM
Hi Jeff,
I'll try to update the google doc (thanks for clarifying).
As for the observations, it is indeed difficult to do when a phase is ended. We can learn some things but we will definitely miss something about interactions and engagements.
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Saskia Baard

November 20, 2013, 15:31PM
Hi guys, I like the direction the interview toolkit is going.

I think there are quite a lot of questions, so maybe we could make it clearer in the instructions that not all of them need to be answered and that they are for guidance only? (or if we want answers to all the questions we should state that, and probably narrow down the questions)

Maybe we could also include a question about what they think their peers might like and how they would interact on the platform, and to see if teams or friends are important?

My personal experience is that I found it difficult to really understand how each phase will work and what the dynamics will be, even though I had looked at previous challenges etc. Maybe a next round of prototyping would need to be an actual (short?) challenge for a (small?) group of test users to get feedback from the different phases.
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Yann Hirlimann

November 17, 2013, 01:18AM
Hi Mel+Frank. Just wanted to share an inspiration I've just posted. Having curriculums with the objective of presenting a TED talk. Open IDEO for teens would be a great tool to help teens reach the objective of presenting a group TED. Both could becomplementary. But sorry, maybe I am adding some complexity here rather than simplicity :)

http://www.openideo.com/open/creative-confidence/ideas/objective-ted/
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Mel + Frank

November 17, 2013, 01:46AM
hey yann - just checking out now. seems there could be good overlap with this as well as other ideas here—a way to really tie off the whole process around creative confidence is to share your story with others. i'll check it out further!

Tom Bradley

November 16, 2013, 08:59AM
Nice idea - this platform is obviously built to take ideas through a creative process, so it makes sense to try and use it.

Would be nice if there were a few problems on there that weren't quite so hard to solve though! ;-)
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Mel + Frank

November 16, 2013, 20:22PM
Yes, it can be kinda tough! What do you think about a BETA BETA type of challenge question, something like: How might we enable this platform to inspire and involve more young people?
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Yann Hirlimann

November 13, 2013, 22:54PM
Destination Imagination is a great site to get ideas of challenges http://www.destinationimagination.org/what-we-do/challenge-program
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Mel + Frank

November 14, 2013, 19:02PM
Yann, amazing. Thanks for sharing this link. The service learning challenges outlined on Destination Imagination (DI) seem especially relevant—pasting below for others to check out. Love the elevator pitch idea for potential local implementation.

Service Learning

OKAY. Here are the rules of the game. Find a community need and put the pieces together. Will you pass or will you play?

Points of Interest
- Use the creative process to identify and select at least one real community need.
- Design and carry out a Project that addresses the real community need.
- Use Play to meet the goal(s) of the Project.
- Use a team-created Elevator Pitch to enlist at least one Community Partner.
- The team will create a live Presentation that features the Project.
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Yann Hirlimann

November 13, 2013, 22:51PM
Great Idea again! in fact, your concept is a great one to get remote schools connected and enable kids with poor local access to creative exchanges to reach out to a great variety of minds.
It would be a great additionnal tool for self taught students in Hole in the wall schools.
http://www.hole-in-the-wall.com/

To answer the question of how to engage kids on the open ideo platform, maybe there could be challenges on a longer timespan, with another phase being the actual prototyping and implementation phases being documented, letting kids show their results.

Having open Ideo fairs, with this time very short challenges could be very exciting for kids. They would meet in a place and spend a week responding to a challenge and exchanging with kids elsewhere.
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Mel + Frank

November 14, 2013, 20:30PM
Hey Yann! Welcome to the virtual team. Great insights here and we're fascinated by this latest link as well. Given your point about more global literacy challenges and also thinking about learning differences when it comes to writing, wondered about the complement of drawing / more visual contributions in addition to textual.. a Shared Whiteboard of some kind perhaps?
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Mel + Frank

November 16, 2013, 20:29PM
Love the idea of OpenIDEO fairs as well! What about an OpenIDEO summer camp for young people? That way you'd have counselors and so forth who could help facilitate and enable young people to work together online and offline on bite-sized local challenges and / or a larger global challenge...?

We've just updated the concept based on a recent discussion with a few other members of the virtual team and would love to hear what you think about the idea of observing and interviewing young people interacting with the current platform. Wondered if you think this might be a good possibility for you to try with a couple of young people at your end?
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Yann Hirlimann

November 16, 2013, 21:17PM
The OpenIdeo Summer camp sounds like a great idea that would bring concrete results. In many African countries, young people access the internet in internet cafés. maybe they could be good spots to organize such events and make teenagers work together on some concrete projects and discover another use of the internet. Or get some financing to install good internet in some remote schools, promoting the fact taht it would be used for open IDEO challenges that could benefit directly the community. It would certainly attract funds as it would both reduce the technology gap and bring local solutions with global collaboration to remote places.

For observing and interviewing young people using the current platform, I'll have to see with my colleague at ImagiNation Afrika. She would know students willing to test, but mostly in private schools. Unfortunately I live in a French speaking country, but I could try out with kids learning English at the British council.
 
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Mel + Frank

November 16, 2013, 21:35PM
Yes, that's a good point. The OpenIDEO camp / fair concept could be a win / win inspiring cc, helping to close the technology gap, and also work as a way to further prototype the platform.

As for interview idea, be great if you could check in with young people learning English at British Council—the language barrier is an interesting challenge in itself!

Lola Lanipekun

November 19, 2013, 23:11PM
I very much like the idea of the Open IDEO collaborative sessions for the youth. A summer camp / roaming Fair is a great way to prototype the idea. Local challenges will be especially great for areas with little or no internet technology available to them.

I agree that the young people should design their own challenges. I also think that implementing the final solution should also be done collaboratively with the sponsors (if there's one). The hands on experience will be good to boost their creative confidence further.
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Mel + Frank

November 20, 2013, 04:46AM
Thanks Lola! I agree that the local challenges make the most sense for young people in areas with less tech access. And designing own challenges does seem really key..
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Saskia Baard

November 13, 2013, 19:51PM
Wow, great contributions so far. Jeff, great job of writing up the open questions, really helps a lot!

Taking a step back & keeping it simple:
Mel+Frank - while reading through the comments, I came to the same conclusion you mentioned in one of your comments: You are drawn to the effective and simple nature of OI.
 
Maybe we need to take a step back, and consider what it is about OI that makes it work. There are so many things which can be incorporated for the young people's version, but as mentioned, this will change the nature of it significantly. I think it would be valuable to simply think about what it is that works, and how we can create a young people's version with minimal changes.

Foundation:
I think your win win situation posted on 10 November is a good base and shouldn't be complicated too much. Anne-Laure also suggested we run a young people's challenge on the current platform - I think this is a good idea to get an idea of the type of interactions and output which is generated.

Meet-ups:
On OI most real life interactions are not facilitated by the platform itself, but happens organically as organised by members. Maybe we shouldn't try and organise this too much, though Anne-Laure does make a very good point that young people still need support in using the platform. Maybe this would be different if they know it's a young people's platform, but not sure about this.

Role of schools/what motivates young people to take action:
Maybe it is possible to participate individually, with the options of implementation through schools, as was suggested earlier. This might help encourage young people who are not usually motivated to engage in social challenges to consider it; but still gives space for young people who are naturally drawn to the concept.
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Yann Hirlimann

November 28, 2013, 09:25AM
Hi Saskia, el + Frank and the rest of the team. I did not have time to read all the passionating discussions, so maybe I'll be off track. For school challenges, the paltform could partner with organisations such as design for change http://www.dfcworld.org as they already engage schools in design challenges to solve community challenges. Sorry, I'm alwaysadding new partenrship ideas, but I think that they fit completely with the OI youth platform and could be great motivators for participation of kids from all around the world!
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Mel + Frank

November 28, 2013, 18:02PM
Yann! Keep it coming! DFC is totally related to this idea and we are in the thick of checking this out further. Through this site we've already uncovered a gold mine of other relevant initiatives and info—have even reached out to a few potential refining partners that we found through and beyond this link. Thanks!
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Jeff Nagata

November 13, 2013, 03:56AM
We've had so many great discussion points through the two huge threads here, that it was hard for me to wrap my head around all the different questions and challenges that needed to be answered! I tried aggregating everything. Here it is, feel free to add more if I missed anything!

- How can we create a positive yet productive "atmosphere" that exists in the current OpenIDEO platform to a OpenIDEO platform for youth? Are there any additional considerations that need to be made for the additional focus of cultivating creative confidence?

- How can we motivate youth to have deep, meaningful engagement with a problem that is larger than themselves? What motivates youth to take action?

- Closely related to the above two questions - how unified vs. diffuse should the challenges be? Allowing youth to submit their own challenges would give them ownership over the platform, creating motivation and more impact on their creative confidence if it gets implemented. At the same time, having sponsored and vetted challenges would increase chances of successful implementation, which would also be good for creative confidence.

- An idea came up where organizations can "adopt" challenges or ideas. We need to figure out what exactly we mean by "adopting", and what the social contract between the adopting organizations and the youth would include. Also, at what stage would the organization "adopt" - during the initial challenges phase, or the final ideas phase?

- Some more suggestions that came up: school registrations for IDs, community administrators & cross pollinators, promise of actual impact and implementation, emphasis on collaboration.

- Should OpenIDEO be structured around teams or individuals?

- What is the best way to incorporate offline meet-ups and local implementation into the global collaborative platform? We discussed the huge power of youth actually experiencing the implementation of their ideas to create tangible, positive change.

- How can we take advantage of a unifying, global challenge and at the same time support local ideas and implementation?
 
- What existing youth systems/organizations can we leverage and incorporate? Schools came up as a idea for integrating OpenIDEO for youth.

- How can we accommodate challenges and ideas with a diversity of scope? How can we communicate the value of challenges/ideas that are smaller in scope?

I hope this helps!
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Mel + Frank

November 13, 2013, 06:34AM
Wow, thanks Jeff! Great summary of points to date for us all to think about and digest.
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Rachael Tachie-Menson

December 09, 2013, 21:30PM
Mel +Frank, is there anything we need in these last 20 some odd hours that I can help you with?
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Mel + Frank

December 09, 2013, 21:59PM
Thanks Rachael—if you have time today, it would be great if you could share a Young User Experience Doodle Note with a young person you know. Takes around 10 mins and all you need are a few colored markers or crayons. Basically show them the current OpenIDEO platform: "How it Works" and a couple of challenges and inspirations and then let them explore. Then they can sketch a response (nothing fancy, just a doodle!) and a quick note about what stood out to them on the Doodle Note here: http://www.openideo.com/open/creative-confidence/ideas/openideo-2014-where-young-people-create-confidently-together/gallery/doodle_sheet_feedback.pdf/

We have outlined a more detailed walkthrough if you have time here:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/16xpTAbJm5akRQV0SErNxP-0x9oK4J0ZT6qWDMP54ryg/edit

Let me know if it works out. Thanks!
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Saskia Baard

November 03, 2013, 14:30PM
Hi Mel + Frank
I think this is a great idea! Especially during this challenge I've been thinking it would be great to have more young voices on the platform.

For this idea, I think it would be great if young people could pitch ideas for challenges - otherwise it's just 'post-young people' who try and guess what young people care about, potentially ending up with a challenge which doesn't really engage them. How can we further encourage young people to use the platform? Do we need other incentives? Do we connect it to services young people tend to use a lot like Facebook?

Recently there have been stories about the negative influence of anonymous negative critiques on young people on social platforms. OpenIDEO is a very positive space - how do we keep this attitude in the Kids version? Maybe there are some ground rules, the role of community adminstrators becomes more important, or everyone should register with a school or association when they make their profile so that anonymity isn't possible?
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Mel + Frank

November 03, 2013, 15:25PM
Thanks for your insightful comments! I think you're right on with this idea of kids pitching and / or becoming more involved in the nature and question of the challenge itself, for the reasons you state well above. I wonder if there could be an extra step in the challenge process. i.e. before inspiration phase there could be the challenge phase—where ideas are pitched and / or vetted by young people. Another build upon this idea would be to draw in this recent idea of meet-ups in the young people's OpenIDEO in schools or after school programs / clubs. As a current OpenIDEO local meet-up participant I find our group does really well with inspiration and larger conceptual discussion, and it may be that this is a great place to have kids develop pitches for challenges or respond to a number of curated potentially sponsored possibilities.

I also really like the point you mention about the importance of OpenIDEO as a much needed social platform. OpenIDEO for young people is all about creating and fostering a 'positive digital tattoo" and "posting positive." I think you're right that the role of community administrators and cross-pollinators would likely become critical in a young people's version. And registering with a school or association profile first is an EXCELLENT idea. I will update the post above to reflect some of your great builds and add you to the team!

What do other people think about how to keep the space positive—facebook link a good idea? School profiles? Local meet-ups?
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Saskia Baard

November 04, 2013, 00:13AM
Mel + Frank - I think an extra step to come up with challenges is a good idea. I am sure I saw an inspiration about the importance of teaching problem setting and that schools often focus only on problem solving (can't find it now, will search more).

Meetups would be great - these can possibly be between schools of a district, so that students interact with other young people beyond their immediate environment. Or meetups between university and school students?
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Jeff Nagata

November 04, 2013, 01:12AM
I was actually wondering how OpenIDEO has such a positive vibe. I've never participated in a online community that has this much consistent positivity and productive discussions.

I feel like setting up the atmosphere of a online community is kind of like its own art-form, and small things can make a huge difference. This is just a hypothesis, but I think part of the reason is because there's a incentive - the possibility of your idea being taken seriously, and actually being implemented to make a difference.

I think that incentive gives people a sense of ownership of what they post online, and their reputation. Since this is such a highly collaborative platform, there's a huge incentive to stay away from the usual careless commenting in other online communities.

So, in my opinion, really emphasizing the possibility and potential of the platform as a vehicle for the ideas of the youth would probably go a long way to create a general atmosphere of positive discussions.

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Jeff Nagata

November 04, 2013, 01:24AM
I also love the idea of adding a extra phase, where youth can frame their own challenges that they want to solve. That would give them a sense of ownership of the platform and would probably also help establish a positive vibe!

One of the key things that I've seen throughout the inspiration phase, when we were talking about factors that encourage youth to unleash their creative potential, is to allow youth to have their voice heard in meaningful ways.

For example, the Studio H curriculum is completely student-centered in that they come up with an idea for a collaborative project, and it's up to the staff and faculty of the school to figure out how they can make it a reality. For example, for one project the students wanted to make a classroom out of shipping containers, so Studio H started a Kickstarter to help them fund it.

Adding the extra phase to allow students to post the problems they care about as challenges would be a great way to create the same youth-centric system in the OpenIDEO platform.

What do you guys think?
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Mel + Frank

November 04, 2013, 04:13AM
yes i agree jeff. for this youth-centric system to work it also has to deliver on the concrete possibilities of the platform to really carry their ideas through... one of the things that needs to be wrestled to the ground here i think is how to tie in the idea of sponsors with a youth-centric platform. as you say, the site builds on feeling like your contributions both individually and collectively come together to really make an impact. having a sponsor to potentially help carry it through is a critical part of that... if this assumption is correct in this case, how would we best work to connect the sponsor with the youth-centric challenges? Would it be best to offer a series of vetted challenges with potential sponsors? Or, is it best to really start from scratch?
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Saskia Baard

November 04, 2013, 10:04AM
Regarding the positive space - I think it must still be able to function as a critical space. I don't think it will really reach it's goal if everyone just pats everyone else on the back. Failure and (constructive) critique will have to be part of it, which might not come that naturally to children/teenagers?

Regarding meetups - maybe it's in the form of a club / school organisation. Then you could have a teacher to facilitate or help out with some issues and to encourage them to also try and implement ideas locally. Or (and this might only work in larger cities / areas, or it could be via skype) regular OpenIDEO meetups could occasionally link with young people working on the kids version?

I agree with the idea of an incentive, but we also have to question if this incentive which works on the regular platform will have the same strength with young people. Will the kids version consist of more, smaller challenges which are easier to implement? Is implementation part of the process?

Implementing locally might help to get local sponsors to implement the challenge - so it's not necessarily linked to one sponsor who sponsors the challenge on the website, but part of it is that children try to find local sponsors to help implement the ideas they see working in their environments?
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Mel + Frank

November 04, 2013, 20:46PM
Yes, I'm curious to hear if other people think the challenges should be similarly ambitious in current OpenIDEO or if we should tackle more bite-sized challenges?

I agree that constructive critique is also a critical part of a young OpenIDEO version and is a vital part of learning to be creatively confident. The platform could potentially nurture this very well—it's open innovation platform is designed to emphasize (and continually practice) "building" upon other people's concepts and moving along a creative trajectory from inspiration to refinement and implementation with positive incentives. Drawing upon the brainstorm in a box tools (using "and" instead of "but" for example) could also really help with this...

My personal sense is that implementation is a critical part of the process—seeing how your work makes an impact and makes a difference is one of the best positive incentives out there...connecting with a purpose outside of yourself and finding creative solutions that make a difference... local meet-ups and prototyping may be even more critical for young people's version perhaps?
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Jeff Nagata

November 05, 2013, 23:33PM
For the challenges, I think the best way to accommodate the diverse interests, access to resources, creative confidence, and abilities of the youth would be to let them decide what scope they want their challenge to be, by letting them frame and submit their own challenges.

One idea I had was, maybe the youth can submit their challenges, and then organizations (from local to national to global) can adopt challenges that best fit with their interests and needs? Organization that adopt a challenge must agree to fully commit and engage with the youth to work on solutions. Even if a challenge doesn't get adopted, everyone is still free to contribute and tackle the challenge with others as well.

I think this would give the most flexibility to the youth, and by giving them control we wouldn't have to make any assumptions about how ambitious the challenges should be. At the same time, the possibility of a challenge getting adopted can create a incentive to contribute positively but also critically at the same time.

I definitely agree that implementation is a very important part of the process. From my experience, one of the biggest enablers of creative confidence was the moment I got to see my ideas turn into a concrete positive impact on the community.

What do you guys think?
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Mel + Frank

November 06, 2013, 02:36AM
The Adopt-A-Challenge idea is really interesting and as you say, allows for a lot of flexility and focus on youth-centric challenges. The adoption of a challenge could be run in parallel with inspiration, after the challenge is decided and is building momentum. Something like:

CHALLENGE PHASE > INSPIRATION + ADOPTION PHASE > IDEAS > APPLAUSE > REFINEMENT > EVALUATION
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Saskia Baard

November 06, 2013, 17:56PM
I agree that it would be great for young people to be able to decide what the scope is. How can we make clear that a small, simple idea can be just as valuable as a big, grand idea? So everyone has the confidence to propose a challenge? Maybe the challenge phase needs to be ongoing - but how do challenges get voted in?

Love the adoption idea.
My feeling is that maybe ideas should be adopted rather than challenges... What if a local organisation adopts a challenge, but there are no suitable idea suitable for that specific community? Or if they can't imagine the ideas which will be generated and what the impact could be?

Maybe any challenge is broad and global at the beginning to maximise interaction and exchanges and to connect young people globally, but the adoption starts at the ideas phase when a local business can pledge to see the idea through to implementation so they can better understand it in their context? (The options through to global organisations also still exist)
What I'm getting at is 1. would a local organisation adopt the global challenge and 2. if a global challenge is adopted by a big eg worldwide organisation, would a local organisation still be able to step in later?
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Jeff Nagata

November 07, 2013, 09:30AM
Saskia, you raise a really good point about what the sponsors would want to adopt. It could become problematic if a sponsor adopts a challenge, and then realizes that they can't implement the ideas that are chosen at the end. That would be bad for creative confidence.

Here is just one version of this idea that popped into my head, based on this conversation. Please let me know what you think:

What if there are no set time-frame for the different OpenIDEO stages for the youth version? If we pursue the idea where youth can submit their own challenges instead of a sponsor, wouldn't it make more sense for the youth to also be able to control when they want to move through the different stages of OpenIDEO?

With this idea, OpenIDEO would look more like a collection of many challenges that are all on-going through different stages at the same time. Each challenge can be self-contained, but also have the option to interact with other challenges that have similar themes.

Then maybe the ideas that come out through each challenge can be put on some sort of directory on the site that can be searched by organization looking to adopt an idea that best matches their capabilities and interests. If a idea is global, local organization can still pledge to implement a version of it in their community.

Also when a idea is adopted by a organization, the ownership of that idea wouldn't have to go to that organization. The same idea can be adopted by multiple organizations at once, all implementing it through their unique capabilities.

I'm curious to see what others think!

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Mel + Frank

November 08, 2013, 07:14AM
Hi Saskia and Jeff - my head is spinning! Great thoughts. I love the emphasis on the youth making decisions more throughout this process and at the same time, I keep thinking about how having a framework, some limitations can also help creative confidence thrive, as was explored in a few of the inspirations. I'm wondering if we open it up so that many of the challenges and phases are fluid, more multi-local and perhaps even running in parallel if this allows for creative confidence to thrive or could it possibly become more diffuse? Local challenges are certainly important and could be adopted locally and could coexist well within a larger challenge I think, something big, something that youth could rally around globally... The sponsor could adopt ideas in a similar way to this platform now potentially. I will continue to ponder and muse more on all these other great ideas—my initial thoughts for now!
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Sylvia Stein

November 08, 2013, 18:57PM
Mel + Frank and everyone else who has been contributing to this idea. Just some quick thoughts / comments, but I need to spend some more time reading all of the comments. A lot of rich food for thought. I love this idea. I think kids would take-off with this platform / structure. One idea would be to start with a 'challenge' (or perhaps we call them 'projects' to make it even less competitive) with something very close to home / school. Toward that end, different communities / schools might ave very different challenges / projects. One idea might be try this idea with a smaller community - one school or one neighborhood / town - where the virtual experience could be enhanced with face-to-face interactions. more later. very exciting concept.
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Sylvia Stein

November 09, 2013, 04:47AM
Wondering if you / the team have seen this TED Talk: http://www.ted.com/talks/kiran_bir_sethi_teaches_kids_to_take_charge.html

It's awe inspiring to see these children take on local challenges from empathy to idea to prototype to execution. Local challenges defined by the kids themselves could obviate the need for 'sponsors.' I also love how this started in one school and then spread locally and then throughout India.
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Mel + Frank

November 09, 2013, 07:07AM
Thanks Sylvia—great Ted Talk! And yes, the journey the children went through from empathy to implementation is quite key for this platform as well. A lot to be learned—particularly from her belief in youth and what they can accomplish if you give them the opportunity. I'm curious to check out more about her work now.
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Mel + Frank

November 10, 2013, 02:55AM
Pondering the conversations here around local challenges vs global challenges and adopting ideas vs challenges as well as the extent of youth involvement throughout the platform / process. Can we have the best of both worlds? Global and local implementation? Adoption of challenges and ideas? Can we ask the youth to double deliver on framing the challenges as well as implementation? If so, how?

We have to admit that we're drawn to current and effective simplicity of the platform—yet we're also drawn to the valuable complexity of these other great ideas to adopt challenges more locally and to involve youth more right from the start. We keep wondering if making it more complex and shifting, without at least the collective satisfaction of at least one clear global goal if youth interest will become more diffuse and wane. Is there a win/win here? Love to hear what you all think. (Saskia, you made a really interesting point about the equally great value of the smaller, less heroic challenges to the larger more heroic ones, and Jeff you seemed to also share ideas along these lines so I'm especially curious your thoughts here!).

Our first thoughts on a potential win/win: the development of a new Challenge Phase at the beginning of the process where the youth put forward ideas for a larger challenge, with these narrowing down to a few winning challenge ideas, based on youth applause and feedback. At some point, possibly during the following Inspiration phase, a larger sponsor "adopts" one of these challenges. Youth globally ideate around this challenge and then it is narrowed down to a few winning concepts (again determined by youth applause and feedback) and the larger sponsor works with these ideas. However, more local sponsors adopt other ideas as part of the implementation process. These local ideas could be further implemented through local meet-ups of schools / community teams. It seems that having a larger challenge theme rallies youth globally, to really track and see how their ideas together made an impact which is important, and then locally adopting ideas towards the end of the Challenge phase rallies youth locally, which is also important...

(Phew! Sorry for the long post.)
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Mel + Frank

November 10, 2013, 02:56AM
One more thing! We personally think a larger sponsor could rally behind a challenge and partner on implementation as a way to show that they truly BELIEVE in the youth to deliver ideas that are important and helpful to them—as part of their social contract with the youth. This belief in the youth and their ideas from the start seems vital to the success of the platform, based on the Ted talk Sylvia shared here.
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Jeff Nagata

November 13, 2013, 03:01AM
Thanks Mel and Frank, these are great questions, and your idea really incorporates many of the discussion points we've had in this thread. I think our challenge right now is to find the right balance that would engage and enable youth to solve problems, and at the same time encourage youth to cultivate their creative confidence.

I love your idea for a win/win scenario! I think it incorporates the strengths of both local and global. I agree that having a unified, global challenge would help foster unified collaboration between youth all over the world. I think the feeling of camaraderie between youth from all walks of life, created from working on a unified challenge, would encourage the kind of collaborative discussions and actions that would be very beneficial for cultivating creative confidence.

In terms of the "youth-driven vs. vetted challenges", I believe the challenges should come from the youth. If one of the main goals of OpenIDEO for youth is to encourage them to cultivate their creative confidence on top of solving problems, I think it's important for youth to be intimately involved from the beginning of the entire process, or else it would end up being another box that is created by someone else, that the youth are forced to follow.

Do you guys think it would be a good idea to have a bigger theme around which youth can submit design challenge ideas? For example, a theme can be "Poverty", or "Water". This idea goes back to a inspiration that was mentioned before, that the right amount of structure at the beginning can act as a foundation and springboard for youth to dive in.

I think we also need to define what we mean when we say "sponsor". What promises/guarantees do organization need to make when they sponsor a challenge? What is their role during the actual OpenIDEO process? What is their role in implementing the solutions? What should be included in the social contract? Do the social contracts change depending on if it's a larger organization sponsoring the initial design challenge, or a local organization sponsoring a idea?









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Yann Hirlimann

November 14, 2013, 18:23PM
Just one short contribution on the how to implement this open Ideo. having kids answering the challenges with videos would open them to less literate people. I live in Senegal, and the fact of writing ideas etc. would put aside many great ideators who do not have the literary skills to join open ideo challenges. Showing teens that you can gain creative confidence without necessarily being able to write decently would be impactful and would bring many more participants, from schools and from outside of schools.
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Mel + Frank

November 14, 2013, 18:44PM
Hi Yann—Thanks for your insightful comments! I think you raise an especially important point here—since we want to inspire the creative confidence of youth globally, we do not want people to feel limited or constrained by their ability to write, etc. Posting videos is a great way to enable youth to contribute and build upon each other's ideas through a variety of skills sets... We really thank you for bringing this up. How could this work optimally in the platform...Perhaps there could be a time limit on the videos—maybe not as limited as Vine but something so that people can peruse and digest ideas more easily?
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Yann Hirlimann

November 14, 2013, 19:06PM
maybe give a talk structure similar to TED talks, with a time limit of 3 minutes. It will also teach the teens an essential communication skill. for exchanges, you now have skype in the class that enables to arrange communication effectively.Of course it would need scheduling, and would not be as spontaneous as Open Ideo. the positive side would be that teens would see each other creating more empathy than real social encounters. Maybe my ideas are a bit too complex to implement :( let me know.
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Ashley Jablow

October 30, 2013, 22:43PM
Love it! At OpenIDEO we've often thought about how we might reach young people to share their inspirations, ideas and world views in our challenges. We have some ideas of our own, but it's still very early days – so I'll be eagerly checking back to see how this concept develops :)
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Mel + Frank

October 31, 2013, 04:51AM
Thanks Ashley—me too!
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Sasha Charlemagne

November 05, 2013, 15:04PM
On social media sites like Instagram, a young person can have hundreds of followers from all corners of the globe.

Often, the interactions between the Instagrammer and his or her followers remains in a virtual "like" world and an exchange of random short hand communication.

So, it would be cool to see some more meaningful and sustained global interactions amongst young people that eventually take the communication offline. Not quite sure what that might look like.

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Mel + Frank

November 05, 2013, 17:55PM
yes, at the core of the current OpenIDEO is this great potential for deepened meaningful connections between people from all over the world, focused on a larger purpose / goal outside of themselves. (though the possibilities of making these virtual connections real in their community through local meet-ups is now there as well). how can we harness that global creative energy for larger good that is currently at the heart of this open innovation model best for young people...? is it possible to augment the current OpenIDEO to attract more young people for the important reasons you state above? or do you think it would be a good idea to create a special young people's version, with different challenges, perhaps sourced or vetted by the young people themselves? big questions!
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Sasha Charlemagne

November 06, 2013, 17:26PM
Maybe in addition to framing the interactions around 'challenges', they can also be framed around 'competitions'.

A challenge can be presented to participants/members to create something of value (for their present or future).

Teams can be formed pending a list of criteria (interest, skills, multi-regional, etc)

Teams are then voted into the challenge and the competition begins thereafter.

The end goal could be that the finalists "meet-up" in a host city giving way to physical interactions amongst a multicultural group of young adults.

The entire process can be sponsored just the same.
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Sasha Charlemagne

November 06, 2013, 17:27PM
Forgot to add one more point ;-).

The end goal of meeting up would be to create or design a response to the challenge.
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Saskia Baard

November 06, 2013, 17:40PM
I really like the idea of teams in the young people's version. (I do still think a young people's version is a good idea, as I believe it will be important to identify challenges / competitions that matter to THEM)

Teams could also aid implementation. Maybe there is a possibility for teams to 'specialise' eg in the different phases. Some teams could exist or spring up to implement ideas after the challenge.
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Anne-Laure Fayard

November 08, 2013, 02:10AM
Like Ashley, I love the idea... I am very excited to see it developing in particular as I've been lately thinking a lot about how to develop the educational potential of the platform.

I have been using the platform in my graduate classes where my students participate (in teams) to challenges as their final project. We (at NYU) also had the chance to experiment with an internal challenge using the OI engine. The challenge was open to all students - i.e. undergrad and grads, from all schools and all campuses (not only NY). In both cases, I've seen the potential of using this platform for nurturing creative confidence.

I like the idea of having a version where students could also propose their own challenges. Yet, in that case, there might be less potential impact, except if the idea is that they would pitch a challenge and then a sponsor will "adopt" it.

I personally think that the impact will be very important: showing that some of the winning ideas will be implemented.

The facilitation of the conversation by community managers, with the help of teachers will also be crucial.

Providing also offline meetings for students will also help them develop their ideas...

Thanks for posting this idea. Looking forward to seeing how it evolves!
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Mel + Frank

November 08, 2013, 07:23AM
I agree Anne-Laure that impact and implementation is very important. How can we enable youth to become more involved with challenges in this young people's version without the impact and implementation becoming more diffuse... And Saskia and Sasha I think the idea of teams is also valuable and wonder if this ties in well with school groups as teams... I do wonder about emphasizing the aspect of competition and am thinking about how best this fits in within a collaborative open innovation framework. The idea of not being judged or risking failure—would these things be encouraged in competitions around challenges? Interested to hear what you think.
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Anne-Laure Fayard

November 08, 2013, 13:37PM
Hi,
I tend to think of having sponsored challenges: it could be by external sponsors, or by schools themselves (e.g. a few schools deciding to get their students to work on an urban issue; they could share their knowledge across cities and then try to implement it in their city or in their school). Impact can be defined in many ways as it is for openIDEO too, but it has to be articulated and celebrated.

Teams can work although this would require to teach kids how to work in teams and mentoring the teams.

Regarding the competition component, I think this would be risky. Intrinsic motivation is at the core of the openIDEO platform (it is explained in the video, it is designed in the platform) and based on my research on OI and other platforms, it is crucial to its success and to the very positive atmosphere mentioned by Jeff. I agree with you that the competition aspect will put at jeopardy the collaborative aspect of the platform as well as the possibility to take risks and experiment.
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Sasha Charlemagne

November 08, 2013, 14:38PM
I wondered about the term competition as well given the trend toward collaboration. It can certainly be deemphasized or reframed.

But this notion of collaboration might need some other framing within a youth/young adult context because quite a number of young people are intrinsically competitive.

My gut tells me that competing for good isn't necessarily a bad thing. Its all in the presentation and framing of things.

And maybe the competition isn't against each or amongst teams but rather a competition between their present and their future. After all, isn't that what this is all about? Aren't we trying to get young people to think about their futures and creatively take part in it?

Why not compete for a greater creative, sustainable and collaborative future?
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Sasha Charlemagne

November 08, 2013, 14:48PM
Also, how do we share this impact with other young people? How do we reward this? Again, I just keep coming back to a 'generational' thinking.

What is the true essence of this generation of young people that we speak of?

Are they very much a 'me' generation wanting to be heard, recognized, rewarded, discovered, paid attention to, etc?

And in a global context, how do we do so and still unite a global generation?

In reading the brief for this challenge there was mention of focusing on a target group -- essentially the ones who can really turn the dial. Who are they and how might a Young Open IDEO attract them?
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Anne-Laure Fayard

November 08, 2013, 14:53PM
Hi Sasha,
I'm not sure if all young people are intrinsically competitive, at least, if they are more than older people.
There is a lot of literature on intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation and about some of the negative effects of extrinsic motivation.

The question might be what you call competing: Is it competing to get a winning idea and seeing it implemented and having an impact, or is it competing for a prize?

Reading your last point, am wondering what kind of challenges you have in mind? Maybe thinking specifically of one or two challenges would help clarify several of the questions that were raised in the comments re. the impact, implementations of the ideas, teams vs. individuals and competition vs. collaboration.
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Sasha Charlemagne

November 08, 2013, 15:07PM
Would you mind sharing an example challenge with me instead that you might see being part of Young Open IDEO? That would really help me align my thinking to see a challenge through other eyes. Please ;-)?

I think its about getting young people to encourage each other. So if a select group is exemplifying creative confidence and their creative confidence is in turn shared, distributed, marketed, etc with a wider group, might that not encourage wider confidence in terms of peer influence?

Some are afraid to try but when they see others try, then they are more inclined to try as well.

I know it seems rather abstract but I'm truly simply relying upon my experiences working with young people in a volunteer capacity over the years.


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Sasha Charlemagne

November 08, 2013, 15:17PM
And certainly all young people are not intrinsically competitive and in such a challenge prompt we can hardly cover the whole.
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Mel + Frank

November 08, 2013, 18:16PM
It might help to test these more abstract ideas about process (collaboration, competition) against specific examples...even if young people eventually determine the challenges in some way. I could throw out some ideas... possible challenges are ones similar to the typical OpenIDEO platform but more youth-oriented, such as: "How might we reduce / prevent / child labor" (something along those lines)? Or, a more creatively defined challenge, such as: "How might we design our front yards / public spaces / school playgrounds to encourage more innovation and creativity in young people in our neighborhoods?" Or one similar to the current challenge, but asking young people directly, such as: "How might we inspire creative confidence and innovation in young people across socio-economic groups?"

Is the process of participating on the OpenIDEO platform itself helping to develop creative confidence? I tend to think so. Yet I can see how more specifically creative / innovative challenges need to be considered. Having youth participate in challenge itself seems important, yet how can we further think through the overarching, general framework. Too open — too diffuse? Too closed and defined—too constraining and counter-productive for cc.

We could ask young people directly, inviting them to visit the current platform and getting their feedback. We could all gather small groups of young people together and see what we find out by watching them use the platform and asking them about many of the questions posed here. What kind of prototyping steps can we take to help us learn more about what kind of platform might be the best jumping off point for youth, from the youth?
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Mel + Frank

November 08, 2013, 18:25PM
Or, what if one of the above challenges (for example) was posed on the current OpenIDEO platform as one of the challenges to follow—so not a whole new version or platform—but a specially focused OpenIDEO for Young People Challenge / Edition where all of the amazing and seasoned OpenIDEO users come alongside youth and help cross-pollinate and administer the challenge, mentoring and also learning from the youth in the process of developing and implementing a solution to an important and meaningful issue? How might we create better, together, young and post-young? Would this draw in more youth in the future OpenIDEO and draw out further inter-generational, school, educational activity/participation?
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Sasha Charlemagne

November 08, 2013, 18:48PM
Thanks so much Mel + Frank for continuing the dialogue ;-).

I can kind of see where the larger questions loom and still am not sure where to go next.

But I keep going back to a direct focus on young people for sure. What inspires you and I to take part in OpenIDEO may not be the same grounding inspirations for young people.

Why should they exercise creative confidence in the first place? We know the reasons why but how do we get them to even begin thinking about these reasons so that they are inspired to create confidently?

I think that's part of the key to building creative confidence -- helping to build a desire without fear or restraint and to do so communally.

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Anne-Laure Fayard

November 09, 2013, 20:44PM

 Hi Sasha, sorry for taking a while to reply and thanks Mel+Frank to continue the conversation.

After reading the idea and some of the comments, I imagine that the OI for young people would have similar broad challenges around social good / innovation as the current OI platform. I thought of some variations of previous challenges. I could imagine something around vibrant cities but maybe more focused: like how might we make our neighborhoods, our schools, more vibrant?

I could also think of a challenge about food and health: how might we learn how to eat healthier food?

Depending on the sponsors, we could also imagine more specific challenges… I also like Sylvia's suggestion in another thread to develop specific local challenges. It might be a good way to start.

I might be completely off. In fact, the idea of asking young people to come up with challenges could be informative to see what are the types of challenges that would be interesting to them. That could be one way of figuring out the type of challenges that will attract them?

My feeling is that the challenge briefs need to feel relevant to young people in the sense that they think they can participate to the conversation and see that they might have an impact (either seeing their idea implemented or being able to implement it themselves).

I like the idea of running a challenge for young people on the current platform to prototype this idea.

BTW, I feel that we might want to define what we mean by "young people"? 12 to 18? older, younger?

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Sasha Charlemagne

November 09, 2013, 21:34PM
No worries :-).

Prototyping might involve a bit of gaming as well to encourage interaction. How do we leverage some of the gaming principles of interaction and reward?

Also, maybe it starts with asking more focused questions about what they like and what the want in terms of a future (locally? Nationally? Regionally? globally?)

Is it that young adults don't think as much about the future? And if they do, what about the future intrigues them?
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Mel + Frank

November 10, 2013, 03:25AM
Anne-Laure—targeting 12-18 year olds actually strikes me as a good age range, including both middle and high school youth. Any older and I think they would likely be best suited and attracted to the current platform. Any younger elementary age youth would likely require different design considerations. What do other people think?
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Anne-Laure Fayard

November 10, 2013, 14:03PM
Thanks Mel+Frank. I share your perspective on the age group.
I think that beyond the platform itself, and the type of challenges, we also need to think of supporting the process and the interactions. Based on my experience with grad students, they still need a lot of support to feel comfortable going on the platform. I think it will also be important for the openIDEO for young people. While young people could join challenges outside of schools, I think it would be useful to get them to start participating through school. What do you think?
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Jeff Nagata

November 13, 2013, 03:07AM
I think schools would be a great entry point for students to get involved in the platform. It would have the greatest reach, since most youth go to middle/high school. Experienced teachers can be great mentors for youth with additional materials (like the toolkits and additional materials we're give in the current OpenIDEO) with tips, suggestions, and other information that would help them guide youth through the creative process.
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Mel + Frank

November 16, 2013, 23:28PM
Hey to follow up on this discussion, we recently had an online chat with Saskia and Jeff (Jeff will post a link to this group for virtual team). and we wanted to let you know that while we feel OpenIDEO offers a lot for schools we re-considered if is suitable/ appropriate in public school setting. Curious to hear what you think. We also are putting together an Interview tool kit for young people — check it out in the updates above. Jeff will share a google doc link with us to follow so we can post any question point ideas etc for the kit.

Also, on another note, Yann brought up the great idea of an OpenIDEO FAIR for young people in the comments aboe and so this led to an idea of an OpenIDEO SUMMER CAMP. Think Summer Camp meets local meet-up meets OpenIDEO. Curious to hear what you guys think about this build. Interesting way to involve older youth as counselors facilitating and coordinating the younger folks in local challenges and / or larger global challenge both offline and online. Could mutually inspire and nurture cc across different age groups and as well serve to further prototype a young people's BETA BETA version of the platform...
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Jeff Nagata

November 17, 2013, 00:17AM
Hey everyone, here is the link to the Google doc: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16xpTAbJm5akRQV0SErNxP-0x9oK4J0ZT6qWDMP54ryg/edit?usp=sharing

Our plan was to use the current OpenIDEO platform and the current Creative Confidence challenge as a prototype. We can have youth use the platform as it is now, to see what needs to be changed to make it work for youth.

To help facilitate this process, we're going to generate a list of questions that we want to answer for the initial round of prototyping. An example of a question is: "What is the engagement level of youth in the current OpenIDEO platform?"

These questions can be used to create the toolkit that people can use to interview and observe kids while they use OpenIDEO as it is now.

Here's the link again:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/16xpTAbJm5akRQV0SErNxP-0x9oK4J0ZT6qWDMP54ryg/edit?usp=sharing

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Sasha Charlemagne

November 17, 2013, 02:02AM
Very cool - I like the camp aspect. Can you elaborate a bit more on that vision? It seems to be a great blending of the "artists in residence" concept.

How do you imagine/ envision the introduction of openIDEO to its target youth audience? Might it have some Kickstarter / start-up like energy or might the energy be different?

I too think this should live or at least start outside of the school environment to give 12-18 year olds a bit more freedom.

What world might 12-18 year olds want to create?

How do 12-18 year olds transition from Facebook, YouTube or Instagram to Young OpenIDEO?

How do we leverage social media?

What social media tendencies and behaviors amongst youth can we emulate and innovate?




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Mel + Frank

November 17, 2013, 02:02AM
Thanks Jeff! I'll update the concept with this link.
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Sasha Charlemagne

November 17, 2013, 02:17AM
Some more builds that help answer some the questions outlined by Jeff:

If the focus remains on teams (vs. individuals), I imagine that organizations with 'built in' youth teams might be invited to take part in a Young OpenIDEO challenge.

Built in youth teams could come from after school programs, youth groups, sports teams, clubs, arts and music based programs, science camps, etc -- pretty much any organization outside of academia that serve large numbers of youth through programs and events.
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Anne-Laure Fayard

November 17, 2013, 04:41AM
Hi,

great to see the idea evolve.

Prototyping and interview kit:
I think it is a great idea to use the current platform as a prototype. I am not sure how you want to use it with the current challenge. Are you assuming that there are already people between 12 and 18 on the platform? And these are the people you want to interview? This in fact was my second question as I was reading the questions you posted on the google doc. Are you thinking of showing the current platform to kids between 12 and 18 and see how they navigate?

OpenIDEO and public schools:
I guess it depends which schools you have in mind. I personally could see some of the NYC public schools being interested. I think the advantage is to have teachers facilitating the process and mentoring. It will be a great way to let young people know about the platform and introduce them to the process. It might not be part of the curriculum but maybe an extra project with support as an after-school. If not through schools, how would you reach out to young people, motivate them and facilitate the process?

OpenIDEO Summer camp:
I really like the idea!
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Mel + Frank

November 17, 2013, 12:37PM
Yes, we were thinking of showing the current platform to 12-18 year olds and seeing how they navigate, observe, ask a few questions about what is working well or could work better.. will work to clarify that process more on the toolkit.

As for schools, agree it could be a great after school complement, camp, etc. and feel that there is a lot of potential to make an impact in schools in general, though perhaps not directly for curriculum given that it is a business-related platform... ?
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Anne-Laure Fayard

November 17, 2013, 14:44PM
Thanks for the clarification Mel+Frank. The problem of only showing the platform - rather than having them engaged with it - is that it is difficult to have a feel of how it works without being involved. It would have been great to have them participate to the challenge. Based on my observations of grad students' first reactions to the platform, it can be a bit confusing / overwhelming.
There might be some opportunities with one of the upcoming challenges to involve a certain number of 12 to 18 years old. However, there might still be some learning by getting them to observe.

I agree that if you are not running specific challenges (I thought that was the original idea but I realize this has evolved), then it will be hard to have teachers involving students in their classes.
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Mel + Frank

November 17, 2013, 19:19PM
Yes, agree that it would be ideal if we could have young people participate in the challenge and be more involved throughout process as a great way to test this idea. As you say the platform can be overwhelming and even intimidating for young people and so this concept of a youth version of OpenIDEO is trying to find a way to encourage and draw upon and learn from youth involvement—and in so doing encourage cc.

The BETA BETA idea of running a similar cc question challenge on the platform or asking young people directly "how might we draw more young people directly to the platform" may be one good next best step in getting more in depth youth involvement/feedback. The interview feedback form is just a way to prototype in baby steps and get some initial feedback. Recognize and agree this is necessarily limited feedback, still feel it is important to talk to young people themselves early on in the process somehow. Totally open to other ideas / ways of doing this!

It would be great to hear feedback from your students also, what you've learned about what works well and doesn't!
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